Teorija

  • Adverbs of time (yet) usually go
- after the verb - He hasn't finished yet.
  
after the verb and object (if there is an object) -
  
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He hasn't finished his breakfast yet.
  
  • Adverbs of time (today, yesterday, tomorrow, every day etc.) usually go at the end of sentences.
  
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He left Paris yesterday.
  
Adverbs of time can also go at the beginning of sentences if you want to put emphasis on the time.
Yesterday he left Paris. 
 
  • Sentence adverbs (certainly, definitely, probably, obviously, evidently, undoubtedly, clearly, apparently etc.) usually go
- after auxiliary verbs and the verb "be",
- before main verbs.
  
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He is obviously clever.
  
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We will certainly go there.
  
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He has probably sold his car.
  
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She definitely works hard.
  
Sentence adverbs ((un)luckily, (un)fortunately, frankly, honestly, naturally, officially, perhaps, possibly etc.) usually go at the beginning of sentences.
  
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Perhaps I'll do it.
  
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Luckily, we didn't miss our bus.
 
  • If there are two or more adverbs in the same sentence, then their order is:
 
 verb
manner
(how)
place
(where)
time
(when)
Maria
studied
hard
in her room
last night.
 
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If there is a verb of movement (go, come, run, leave etc.) in a sentence, then the order is:
 
 verb of movement
place
(where)
manner
(how)
time
(when)
He
came
home
by bus
yesterday.
 
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Atsauce:
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